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With posts on Facebook reaching fewer and fewer users, everyone is striving to find ways to expand their reach. Posting photos is one way to drive engagement on Facebook pages. And some marketers believe using multiple images in a Facebook post may increase Reach even further.

However, according to Buffer’s Kevan Lee, when sharing content on Facebook, the best results will come from links.

Link posts that use the built-in Facebook link format receive twice as many clicks compared to links typed into a photo update. And Lee adds that this information is derived from Facebook itself, which conducted studies on the number of clicks for different post types.

Their findings suggest that link format outguns photos, and when sharing content on Facebook, the best results come from links.

So what does a link post look like compared to a photo post? And how can you publish one and not the other?

Link posts take advantage of meta tags from the webpage, including information on the page’s title, description, and photos. When you paste a link into the update box on your Facebook page, Facebook will pull this information in automatically and place it in a link format.




Photo posts require uploading and attaching a photo to your update, along with the custom text you choose to add. You can include a link in the custom text and these are the links that fail to get the better click rate compared to link posts.

Lee points out that when you’re writing a new update, you won’t see an icon to enter a link. The options up top are for Status, Photo/Video, and Offer/Event. To share a link, copy and paste a URL into the composer window, and Facebook will display the link’s meta information—title, description, and photo.

With the link that you share, you can control the text and image by editing the open graph tags on your page. Lee has written here about how this whole process works, and if you want to check your progress before publishing an update, you can plug in your URL into the Facebook Open Graph Debugger tool to get a preview (and check to see what might need fixing).

Lee provides 4 more posting tips he characterizes as establishing the perfect Facebook post.

1. A perfect Facebook post is short, as little 40 characters if at all possible

Facebook's post should be 40 characters.

Posts at this length tend to receive a higher like rate and comment rate—in other words, more engagement. A Buddy Media study of 100 top on Facebook found that 40 characters or fewer receives the most engagement on average (it also happens that these ultra-short posts are the least frequent types of posts on Facebook).

Other studies have confirmed the “shorter is better” maxim. BlitzLocal studied 11,000 Facebook pages and found that engagement increased as posts got shorter. Track Social noticed the same effect in its study: So-called “tiny” posts of zero to 70 characters saw the most likes, comments, and responses.

Facebook post length

And keep in mind that you’ll also get to use the link’s title and description text to entice readers to click, comment, and engage. The 40-character intro is more of a teaser, supplemented by the text in the link itself.

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2. A perfect Facebook post is sent at non-peak hours

The thought process goes like this: You compete with hundreds of thousands of posts to be seen in the News Feeds of your fans. If you post your updates when few others are posting, your updates stand a better chance of making it through.

We’ve referred to this “Late Night Infomercial Effect” before. And Track Maven found some data to back it up. In their study of 5,800 pages and over 1.5 million posts, Track Maven came up with best practices and advice for brands. Among the tips, post on Saturdays and Sundays and post after regular work hours.

In order to land a spot on a user’s Facebook News Feed, try shifting your scheduling strategy from posting during the most popular times in the workweek to the most effective times. The best window for a workday is 5:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. Eastern Time. For another bump in engagement, try posting on the weekend.

3. A perfect Facebook post is part of a consistent sharing strategy

Mark Schaefer and Tom Webster analyzed data on 8,000 Facebook pages (data courtesy of AgoraPulse) to identify how brands were impacted by the apparent drop in organic reach. They came away with some intriguing stats (more than 70 percent of pages had a 30 percent or more decline in organic reach) and some best practices from the handful of pages that are succeeding.

In particular, they focused on four pages that had found success and the four characteristics that each page had in common:

* They target an audience with a strong passion

* They publish very good content (at least, very good for their target audience)

* They publish very consistently (at least once a day, often more)

* They get a LOT of shares (thanks to the 3 points above), and shares are what offers the highest level of “viral” visibility for a page’s content.

Let’s assume you have an audience that is passionate about your page (which is why they became fans, right?). Let’s also assume that you are publishing good content.

What’s the key third ingredient? Consistency.

The successful pages in this study posted at least once a day, creating an expectation among its fans of consistent, quality content. There are several ways of staying on schedule with your Facebook posts; set up a content calendar or sign up for a free scheduler like Buffer. Then start filling your queue with quality content.

4. A perfect Facebook post includes a newsworthy element (optional)

This last point might not apply to some brands whose content and industry don’t lend itself well to timeliness. Still …

If there’s ever a way to slip in a newsworthy angle to your Facebook post, do so.

Facebook’s latest tweaks to its News Feed algorithm give a slight boost to timely, trending topics.

We’ve heard feedback that there are some instances where a post from a friend or a Page you are connected to is only interesting at a specific moment, for example when you are both watching the same sports game, or talking about the season premiere of a popular TV show.

Facebook is making this update in two ways:

* Factoring in trending topics

* Looking at when people like or comment on a post

The first element is related to Facebook’s “trending” section of the site, which identifies topics and conversations that are popular among users.

facebook's trending topic

The second element factors in the rate at which users are liking or commenting on a post. Facebook currently looks at total number of likes and comments as a factor in whether or not to display a post in the News Feed.

With this latest update, another consideration will be when those likes and comments occur.

How to Manage & Grow Your Social Media Accounts

Socialdraft is your all-in-one tool for Social Media management. Socialdraft allows you to:

Schedule posts to multiple Social media accounts
Monitor your online reputation
Have multiple people create and post content
Pull Reports
Engage
and much more
If you’re curious about how Socialdraft works, take us for a risk-free trial.

Most businesses using Facebook on a regular basis to promote their company know by now that posts on Facebook continue to reach fewer and fewer users. With Facebook’s organic reach rapidly in decline, some experts claim it will eventually plunge to virtually nothing.

This realization has driven marketers to devise experimentally creative ways to reach more users. Most savvy marketers know that photos drive engagement on Facebook pages. According to Social Bakers, 87% of a Facebook page’s interactions happen on photo posts. No other content type receives more than 4% of interactions. Facebook pages embrace photos as posts, and 75% of page updates are photos.

Okay, So How About a Facebook Post With Multiple Images?

Early this year, Jon Loomer, one of our favorite marketing consultants, claimed it was possible that using multiple images in a Facebook post may increase Reach.

Loomer explained he had received information from various vendors that if you create a post with multiple images, you will reach far more users than with a typical image share — not a photo album, but a standard text share with added images.

In the example Loomer provides, this is done within the “Status” area of the publisher by typing your message and then clicking the camera icon to add multiple images from your desktop.




The key, says Loomer, is for the images to look presentable when uploaded together. “If you post two or three images, all will be presented side-by-side within the News Feed, on your Timeline and within the permalink.”

Loomer cites several people who provided him with successful illustrations. One was from Patrick Cuttica of SocialKaty.

Patrick provided the examples below:

* Home decor brand page with 5k-10k fans saw 262% increase over average Reach of five prior single image posts

* E-Commerce apparel brand page in 20k-40k fan range saw 280% increase in average organic reach over five prior single page posts

Patrick highlighted a couple of more important points: The decor page saw a 989 % increase in post clicks while the apparel page saw 870%. In each case, this happened even though fewer stories were generated.

Here are a few more success stories people shared with Loomer:

From Michelle Goulevitch:

“If you post 2 images instead of 3 its a better look in the news feed. Not only is reach up on these types of posts, but my engagement is up too (yay!).”

From Dennis Meador:

“Yes I post 3-4 pics at a time and get 2-3 times the reach even with same likes/comments.”

From Jose Mathias:

“Have seen that actually, with a page of 4,200+ likes. Multiple images reach like 3000 while text 2000 and links around 900-1000.”

From Bridget Cleary:

“We’ve found the same, by posting multiple images the reach seems to have improved.”

Considerations

Loomer suggests thinking of this multiple image concept in terms of utility: Do you think that sharing multiple images in this way will provide value? Is it something you think your fans will respond to?

Quick Tip: In Loomer’s own test, he only used square images that were 1200×1200 pixels. Facebook appeared to crop out the outer 5px or so, but kept each image square.

“I plan on experimenting with it. I recommend you do the same. But when you do, make sure you look beyond the metric of Reach. Does it lead to more engagement? More stories? More website traffic? More sales?”

How to Manage & Grow Your Social Media Accounts

Socialdraft is your all-in-one tool for Social Media management. Socialdraft allows you to:

Schedule posts to multiple Social media accounts
Monitor your online reputation
Have multiple people create and post content
Pull Reports
Engage
and much more
If you’re curious about how Socialdraft works, take us for a risk-free trial.